Super Plants!

A picture of Agastache 'Rosie-Posie'

Endless-blooming perennials. Jurrasic-sized ferns. Built-in deer and rabbit resistance. Welcome to the world of Super Plants, where today’s hybridizers are creating amazing plants that defy what many horticulturists thought was possible. By Abby Lapides Elliott (This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener April 2015 issue) Endless-blooming perennials. Jurrasic-sized ferns. Built-in deer and rabbit resistance. Welcome to the world

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The Wonderful World of Orchids

A photo of a purple phalaenopsis orchid

Orchids have an undeserved mystique. They are easily grown indoors by mimicking their growing conditions in the wild. Most are epiphytic and grow attached to trees. By Debbie Colombo and Steffie Littlefield (This article first appeared in The Gateway Gardener January/February 2016) Orchids have an undeserved mystique. They are easily grown indoors by mimicking their growing conditions in the wild.

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What’s in Your Garden?

An american toad in a native garden

It’s no secret that native gardens lack plant variety compared to traditional gardens. Why not try more native plants in your garden?! By Scott Woodbury (This article first appeared in The Gateway Gardener January/February 2015.) It’s no secret that native gardens lack plant variety compared to traditional gardens. A trip to a local garden center illustrates the point. Native plants

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Preserving Your Harvest

A picture of jarred preserves

There are many ways to preserve your summer harvest and extend your enjoyment of self-grown produce into the fall and winter.  You might regret giving all your produce away come winter when you have a hankering for locally grown produce. By Mara Higdon (This article was first published in The Gateway Gardener September 2015 issue.) There are many ways to

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Rescue and Renovate Your Cool-Season Lawn

a photo of a man fertilizing a lawn

Cool-season lawns need “cool” temperatures at night for them to recover from the high daytime temps. When we don’t get cool nights and rain, the lawns suffer (get diseases & weeds) and they won’t recover until the cool nights return. By Glennon Kraemer (This article first appeared in The Gateway Gardener September 2014 issue) Cool-season lawns need “cool” temperatures at

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